Scooty Dirt Tourismo Sr.

 This is the first version of the bike, built with the parts we had available at the time. We've only improved it since then.

This is the first version of the bike, built with the parts we had available at the time. We've only improved it since then.

About The Bike: A friend of ours approached us with an old Hardrock frame when he heard about this project, warning us it was going to be in rough shape, but ours if we wanted it. Boy, was he wrong. No dents, rust, cracks, dings, and like two paint chips this thing is mint. Except that it looks like it was stored on a bed of nails, on a bed being jumped on by 6 toddlers for a few hours. Point is it has some cosmetic scratches. Point is, since the frameset was cheap, and since it was a bare frameset, we put some extra little emphasis on the quality of the parts we installed. More on this later. To keep it from rusting, we used 2 layers of ceramic paint sealer with adequate cure time between, and, just, like, obsessively large quantities of carnauba wax. This ensures that water should be beading up instead of running off for at least a couple of seasons of riding and keeps things from getting nearly as dirty. The paint that remains is undoubtedly glossier and shinier than it ever was before, scratches and all. The chipped spots are glossier than most fresh factory paint jobs. The effect is a bit strange. It looks newer than any new bike, and older than most old bikes. This is further highlighted by the moustache handlebars, which to most seem as familiar as they do unfamiliar.

It is a bike that will become more capable as you become more capable. The more you try with it, the more you feel comfortable with, the more you can do with it. That’s a bit confusing, so we’ll try again. This isn’t a bike that we will sell you promising that it will help you do anything you don’t care about doing. “Is it a good road bike?” That’ll depend on how good you are at riding on roads. “Can it be a good trail bike?” That’s all on you. It can be a good trail bike, a good touring bike, a good road bike etc, because nothing on it will could hold you back from doing any one of those things if you want. The tires are fast and light and grippy and wide and comfy, the frame is light and strong and stable and stiff, the bars are wide and narrow and short and tall and long, and the seat is pretty comfy too! Will is soak up every bump in the trail like a microfiber to a puddle, weigh as much as your index finger, climb like a goat running from angrier goats and descend like a Stukka just like your Santalized Stumphopper? No, but it’ll do most of that stuff pretty well, and when you get to the end of the trail it’ll be a much faster road bike than your mountain specific machine could ever dream of.  Will it let you blow out peoples eardrums as you break the sound barrier, weigh as much as your pinkie finger, and come specced with a bright yellow jersey FROM THE FACTORY? Nah, but if you want to ride down, say a dirt road, or a gravel road, or even rough pavement, or like, a speedbump or a poth… Yeah the point I’m trying to make is that roads aren’t paved with glass, and when things get a little rough, anybody who isn’t grateful for a bit of leeway isn’t a real cyclist, they’re like an athlete, or dedicated, or something else altogether unholy and unhuman. And the best part? If the paint gets scratched, which inevitably happens if you have fun on your bike, you get to tell people “It was like that when I found it…”

Ross Terry